Skip to Main Content

Breadcrumb

  1. Illinois DNR
  2. Outreach
  3. Kids for Conservation

Kids for Conservation ®  

 

Featured Articles

  1. Article number 1 - Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair
  2. Article number 2 - Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair
  3. Article number 3 - Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair
  4. Article number 4 - Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair
  •  Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is Illinois' State Insect. It is found throughout our state and is easily recognized in all of its life stages. It relies on milkweed plants as food for its larval stage. Without milkweed plants, there will be no monarchs. Monarch populations have been rapidly declining in North America. From 1999 through 2012 in the Midwestern United States, there was a 64 percent decrease in the amount of milkweed available and an 88 percent decline in the number of monarchs present. Monarchs are unusual because they make a yearly migration to survive the winter. For monarchs in eastern North America, the migration takes most of them to a specific area in Mexico. For the 2013-2014 overwintering season in Mexico, monarchs covered just 0.67 hectares (1.66 acres) of forest, the smallest amount of overwintering monarchs seen in these locations since they were discovered. The largest area in the past 20 years was 20.97 hectares (51.82 acres) in the winter of 1996-97.
  •  Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is Illinois' State Insect. It is found throughout our state and is easily recognized in all of its life stages. It relies on milkweed plants as food for its larval stage. Without milkweed plants, there will be no monarchs. Monarch populations have been rapidly declining in North America. From 1999 through 2012 in the Midwestern United States, there was a 64 percent decrease in the amount of milkweed available and an 88 percent decline in the number of monarchs present. Monarchs are unusual because they make a yearly migration to survive the winter. For monarchs in eastern North America, the migration takes most of them to a specific area in Mexico. For the 2013-2014 overwintering season in Mexico, monarchs covered just 0.67 hectares (1.66 acres) of forest, the smallest amount of overwintering monarchs seen in these locations since they were discovered. The largest area in the past 20 years was 20.97 hectares (51.82 acres) in the winter of 1996-97.
  •  Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is Illinois' State Insect. It is found throughout our state and is easily recognized in all of its life stages. It relies on milkweed plants as food for its larval stage. Without milkweed plants, there will be no monarchs. Monarch populations have been rapidly declining in North America. From 1999 through 2012 in the Midwestern United States, there was a 64 percent decrease in the amount of milkweed available and an 88 percent decline in the number of monarchs present. Monarchs are unusual because they make a yearly migration to survive the winter. For monarchs in eastern North America, the migration takes most of them to a specific area in Mexico. For the 2013-2014 overwintering season in Mexico, monarchs covered just 0.67 hectares (1.66 acres) of forest, the smallest amount of overwintering monarchs seen in these locations since they were discovered. The largest area in the past 20 years was 20.97 hectares (51.82 acres) in the winter of 1996-97.
  •  Kids for Conservation®: Photos Needed for Initial Online Issue and Illinois State Fair

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is Illinois' State Insect. It is found throughout our state and is easily recognized in all of its life stages. It relies on milkweed plants as food for its larval stage. Without milkweed plants, there will be no monarchs. Monarch populations have been rapidly declining in North America. From 1999 through 2012 in the Midwestern United States, there was a 64 percent decrease in the amount of milkweed available and an 88 percent decline in the number of monarchs present. Monarchs are unusual because they make a yearly migration to survive the winter. For monarchs in eastern North America, the migration takes most of them to a specific area in Mexico. For the 2013-2014 overwintering season in Mexico, monarchs covered just 0.67 hectares (1.66 acres) of forest, the smallest amount of overwintering monarchs seen in these locations since they were discovered. The largest area in the past 20 years was 20.97 hectares (51.82 acres) in the winter of 1996-97.
    
Use the information on this page to learn more about monarchs and what you can do to help them. Tell us about your experiences with monarchs and send photos, too!

Kids for Conservation® requests are intended for youth younger than 18 years of age. Educator resources are posted on this page.




Tell Us About It!

Can You Find Them!?

I've Seen One!

Monarch Mania! Videos

Monarchs/Milkweeds Resources

What's Happening In August?